DCB 36 Rotating Lighthouse Lens

 

Description

1930's DCB 36 Rotating Lighthouse Beacon, in working order with clear white panels. This type of Lens was used at several West Coast Lighthouses during the 1930's and was considered to be very reliable. It runs on 115 VAC, and has a Metal Halide Bulb which can be seen at a distance of 15 Miles. Very impressive to run in your Lighthouse Museum, and very interesting and Massive as it turns around casting a beam over the entire area. Nice Display Pedestal is included as Shown.

The DCB-36, an aviation rotating beacon, was manufactured by Crouse-Hinds

A DCB-36 beacon served in
Cape May Lighthouse (NJ)
for over 50 years

The beacon was a double-ended rotating optical system that used an incandescent lamp (in the United States) to produce two narrow beams of light 180 degrees apart. The beams revolved at a predetermined speed of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10 or 12 R.P.M. as selected. The standard speed was 6 R.P.M.
The standard installation (six revolutions per minute) produced a flash of white light of 1,200,000 candlepower every five seconds of 0.17-second duration, though this length of flash was not recommended for marine aids. The U.S. Lighthouse service noted that “simple back gearing could be supplied to provide three or two revolutions per minute if desired, giving a flash of 0.34-second duration every ten seconds, or a flash of 0.5-second duration every 15 seconds. Still longer flashes can be produced by the use of frosted bulb electric lamps, but with a considerable decrease in candlepower.”

 

Price

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Purchase Information

Call or email Steve Gronow to get your questions answered and find out how to finalize your order.

Phone:810-599-5147Email:Get email address

 

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